CDC’s new policy on dogs entering the U.S.

Secure Your Dog’s Travel with CDC-Compliant ISO Microchipping

Effective August 1, 2024, ISO-compliant microchip is required for dogs entering the U.S.

Continue reading for more information on the microchip component of the new regulation.

Secure Your Dog’s Travel with CDC-Compliant ISO Microchipping

Effective August 1, 2024, ISO-compliant microchip is required for dogs entering the U.S.

Continue reading for more information on the microchip component of the new regulation.

So, What Does This Mean for Pet Owners?

CDC Pet Travel Regulations - Dogs Entering Into U.S.
  • All dogs Must Be 6 months or older: Dogs must be over 6 months old as per the requirement.

  • Have Your Pet Microchipped: Visit your veterinarian to administer a grain-sized microchip, free of pain, for your pet. Microchip must be ISO-compliant.

  • Register Your Pet’s Microchip: For your own record, register, and download a copy of the registration certificate, with a reliable database like the BC Pet Registry.

  • Check the CDC’s Website: For all other requirements including rabies vaccine, certificates and forms in order to bring your dog into the US

  • Consult Your Veterinarian: Ensure your pet’s vaccinations are up-to-date and obtain all necessary health certificates and documentation.

  • Apply for Pre-Approval Early: If coming from a high-risk country, submit your application to the CDC as soon as possible.

So, What Does This Mean for Pet Owners?

I have a dog, but no microchip

Starting August 1, 2024, it is mandatory to have your dog microchipped in order to travel to US and the microchip must be ISO certified. In BC Pet Registry, all microchips we use are ISO-certified; specifically, ISO 11784 and ISO 11785, as required by the new policy for radio-frequency identification (RFID) of animals. Please contact your veterinarian to schedule an appointment for microchipping.

I have a dog, and they are microchipped but not ISO-certified

If your dog’s microchip is not ISO-compliant, it is essential to take necessary actions to ensure compliance with the new regulations. For guidance tailored to your specific situation, please visit your local veterinary clinic to discuss the best course of actions that align with the updated requirements and your pet’s well-being.

I have a dog and they have an ISO certified microchip

Having an ISO-certified microchip for your dog means that it meets globally recognized standards for radio-frequency identification (RFID) of animals, as well as the new regulation that will be effective from August 1, 2024. This also ensures compatibility with universal scanners worldwide, making it easier to identify your pet if they become lost or separated from you. However, it is important to ensure that all necessary documentation, including microchip information, is up-to-date and accurately recorded in the BC Pet Registry or other relevant pet registries. If you have any questions or need assistance with updating your pet’s information, please contact your local veterinary clinic or the BC Pet Registry for guidance.

What is an ISO-Compliant Microchip?

An ISO-compliant microchip ensures universal compatibility with standard scanners worldwide, crucial for international pet travel and reliable identification. This significantly increases the chances of reuniting lost pets with their owners.

BC Pet Registry Pet Microchip

Adheres to ISO-Standards
ISO-compliant microchips follow the specific standards set by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) for animal radio-frequency identification (RFID), specifically ISO-11784 and ISO-11785.

CDC Pet Travel Regulations - Dogs Entering Into U.S.

Universal Compatibility
ISO-compliant microchips operates at the globally recognized frequency of 134.2 kHz, ensuring that it can be read by any universal scanners (FDX-B) worldwide.

CDC Pet Travel Regulations - Dogs Entering Into U.S ISO Microchip Example

Unique Numeric Identification Code
ISO-compliant microchip usually contain a unique 15-digit identification number. Note that many universal scanners used in the U.S. have been unable to detect microchips that begin with the numbers 1 or 8.

ISO stands for International Organization for Standardization
ISO microchips are widely recognized and compatible with most universal scanners and databases globally
Non-ISO Microchips may have limits
It may have different frequencies / encoding formats compared to ISO microchips; they may have limited compatibility with scanning equipment and databases, particularly in regions where ISO standards are prevalent Microchipping
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Why Use BC Pet Registry Microchips?

Enhanced Pet Safety and Security
Easy Access to Assistance

It is crucial to choose the ISO-compliant options to ensure the pets have the most secure form of identification, while also following the new policy for dogs traveling between Canada and US, via airway, sea and land.

FAQ

If your dog already has a microchip implanted, ensure that it is ISO-compatible and meets the necessary standards. This would be ISO 11784 and 11785, which relates to the radio-frequency identification (RFID) of animals. Additionally, the microchip number must be accurately documented on all required forms and veterinary records. For more information, please ask your local veterinary clinic whether your dog’s microchip meets the ISO standards.

If your dog’s microchip is not ISO-compliant, it is essential to take necessary actions to ensure compliance with the new regulations. For guidance tailored to your specific situation, please visit your local veterinary clinic to discuss the best course of actions that align with the updated requirements and your pet’s well-being.

Dogs must be microchipped before receiving a rabies vaccine for the vaccine to be considered valid. For further information specific to the topic of vaccination, please visit: LINK (source: CDC official account post)

While tattoos can serve as identification for pets, they do not meet the requirements specified by the updated CDC’s new dog travelling/importation requirements. In many cases, microchipping is preferred over tattoos because it provides a more reliable and universally recognized form of identification, especially for international travel. ISO certified microchips are standardized and can be easily scanned to retrieve essential information about your pet, whereas tattoos may fade over time or be hard to read. All BC Pet Registry microchips are ISO-certified. For more information on booking an appointment for microchipping, please visit your local veterinary clinic or contact your local BC SPCA about microchip clinics.

All dogs entering the US must meet the new requirements regardless of the reason for their visit or the length of their visit. Dogs coming from Canada or Mexico, or other dog rabies-free countries, are included.

Currently, this new policy effective on August 1, 2024 only applies to dogs. However, domestic cats are still subject to inspection at ports of entry. For more information regarding other types of pets, visit the official CDC website Bringing an Animal into U.S. | Importation | CDC

Take Action Now!

Don’t have a microchip?
Get your BC Pet Registry ISO-microchip from participating veterinary clinics.

Already have a microchip? 
Ensure your dog’s safety by registering with the BC Pet Registry now!

For more detailed information, visit the CDC’s Official Website.